Loading…
twitter facebook mail play
Important information regarding COVID-19

Please note that almost all of the museums are open again. Please pay attention to the requirements, for further information
please contact the museums in advance or consult the websites. For further information concerning the State Castles and Gardens of Hesse, please visit www.schloesser-hessen.de/de/corona-hinweise.
Digital programmes are available: www.wissenschaft.hessen.de

READ MORE

  Show overview

Travel back to the Roman Empire - Saalburg Roman Fort (Part 2)

It made perfect sense to the Romans that the border of the Roman Empire here in Saalburg was not an impassable rampart, but that instead, via lots of passageways, it enabled an intensive trading of goods with the Germanic tribes. The various border forts along the Limes sheltered the many legionaries who monitored border traffic, issued permits and collected customs duties. About 40 years after it was built, the border fort at Saalburg was replaced by a 3.2 hectare camp for an infantry unit with around 600 men, and a wall constructed from timber and stone. A camp village, where the soldiers’ families lived and craftsmen and traders also settled, developed alongside the road to the fort. The fort was further expanded with stone structures and the camp village received a large bathing complex and a hostel as well as various other public buildings. Over time, the small military post developed into a settlement of almost 2,000 soldiers and civilians.

There are many theories as to why, despite its dominance, the Roman Empire eventually collapsed. “The fall of the Roman Empire lies, climatically speaking, in the medieval ice age. It’s quite possible that the Germanic tribes ran out of food, and that the population pressure on the borders of the Roman Empire became too great,” explains Dr Carsten Amrhein. What is certain is that in 233 AD, the settlement around today's Saalburg was set on fire after a raid by Germanic tribes, and that all of the Romans’ possessions fell into the hands of their attackers. The Alemannic German tribes attacked and plundered the border provinces over and over again until the Limes was finally abandoned by the Romans, and with it the settlement around today's Saalburg. Over time, the fort fell into disrepair and was used as a quarry. “We even suspect that the White Tower in Bad Homburg was built with stones from the Roman fort,” says Dr Carsten Amrhein.

Previous article in the series:
Travel back in time to the Roman Empire - Saalburg Roman Fort (Part 1)

Next article in the series:
Travel back in time to the Roman Empire - Roman Fort Saalburg (Part 3)

Gallery


Published on 21.06.2018

Share on Twitter?

By clicking on this link you leave the Kultur in Hessen website and will be redirected to the website of Twitter. Please note that personal data will be transmitted in the process.

Further information can be found in our privacy policy.

Share on Twitter

Share on Facebook?

By clicking on this link you leave the Kultur in Hessen website and will be redirected to the website of Facebook. Please note that personal data will be transmitted in the process.

Further information can be found in our privacy policy.

Share on Facebook

Bereit für Facebook?

Mit dem Anklicken dieses Links verlassen Sie die Webseite Kultur in Hessen und werden auf das Internet-Angebot des Netzwerks Facebook weitergeleitet. Bitte beachten Sie, dass dabei persönliche Daten übermittelt werden.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer Datenschutzerklärung.

Zu Facebook

Bereit für Youtube?

Mit dem Anklicken dieses Links verlassen Sie die Webseite Kultur in Hessen und werden auf das Internet-Angebot des Netzwerks YouTube weitergeleitet. Bitte beachten Sie, dass dabei persönliche Daten übermittelt werden.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer Datenschutzerklärung.

Zu Youtube

Bereit für Instagram?

Mit dem Anklicken dieses Links verlassen Sie die Webseite Kultur in Hessen und werden auf das Internet-Angebot des Netzwerks Instagram weitergeleitet. Bitte beachten Sie, dass dabei persönliche Daten übermittelt werden.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer Datenschutzerklärung.

Zu Instagram

Bereit für Pinterest?

Mit dem Anklicken dieses Links verlassen Sie die Webseite Kultur in Hessen und werden auf das Internet-Angebot des Netzwerks Pinterest weitergeleitet. Bitte beachten Sie, dass dabei persönliche Daten übermittelt werden.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie in unserer Datenschutzerklärung.

Zu Pinterest